Angels In The Field Rescue Restoring Victims Human Trafficking, and the Report UN Highlights

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Debra Lopez President: Angels In The Field In Which was in Colombia for 1 month investigating Human
trafficking of Girls In Medelline, Colombia
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UN report highlights ‘drug-sex’ tourism concerns in Medellin
Oct 25, 2013 posted by Taran Volckhausen
UN report highlights ‘drug-sex’ tourism concerns in Medellin
Share on Facebook Share on Linked In Tweet about this on Twitter Share on RedditDigg thisShare on StumbleUponShare on TumblrEmail this to someoneThe United Nations Office on Drug and Crime (UNDOC) and Medellin Mayor’s Office released a report Friday highlighting public concerns surrounding “drug-sex tourism” in Colombia’s second-largest city.
The report examined the relationship between regular tourist services, such as those provided by hotel operators and taxi drivers, and the demand for illicit activities, including drug consumption and sex commerce in relation to the human trafficking of children and adolescents in the city of Medellin.
Although the report did not offer a “rigorous study” or “specific numbers” on tourist behavior or preferences in relation to drug use or sex tourism, it reported on an investigation carried out through interviews and document reviews that attempted to explore the hidden world of tourist vice in the city – primarily in the neighborhoods of El Poblado and El Centro, where there are a high number of foreign visitors.

The study classified two groups of visitors who were highly likely to seek drugs and sex: wealthy older men staying at hotels while on business in the city and who may search out sexual services; and low-budget backpackers who stay at “party hostels” and who are likely to search for cheap drugs.

According to the investigation, many of those seeking drugs were more likely to purchase sex as well, as sex-purchasers were more likely to find drugs. The report argued that the “informality” of the “sexual service” industry in Medellin lent itself to connections with illicit drug markets and human trafficking of children and adolescents.

Foreigners were reportedly attracted to the “paradise of drugs” reputation of the city due to the availability of “high-quality and low-priced psychoactive substances,” combined with a perceived low priority, or even complicity, of local law enforcement in regards to drug consumption among groups of foreigners.

The report also mentioned tourists who, in their visit to Medellin and Colombia, tour plantations and laboratories connected with the national and international drug trade.

“It is a business and the question is economic,” said an anonymous local source interviewed on underground drug and sex markets aimed at foreigners. “In Medellin, ‘foreigner’ is synonymous with ‘money’.”

In the investigation’s interviews with minors who had been victims of human trafficking, all admitted to having had sexual encounters with foreigners.

The report offered recommendations to clean up Medellin’s reputation, hoping to decrease the number of tourists visiting the city motivated by sex and drugs by increasing controls of travel agencies playing up the image of “Pablo Escobar” lawlessness that still haunts the city two decades after his death in 1993.

In assessing the problems and solutions to “drug-sex tourism,” the report was careful to mention that it did not wish to tarnish the city’s “efforts,” which have “deservedly” given it a reputation as a growing Latin American center of “innovation, transformation, culture, and entrepreneurship.”

Sources
Estudio Exploratorio Descriptivo de la dinámica delictiva del tráfico de estupefacientes, la trata de personas y la explotación sexual comercial asociada a viajes y turismo en el municipio de Medellín (UNDOC report)
Narcoturismo Sexual Crece En Medellín (El Colombiano)

220px-Maria_Cantwell,_official_portrait,_110th_Congress

Maria E. Cantwell is the junior United States Senator from the state of Washington, serving since 2001. Wikipedia
Born: October 13, 1958 (age 55), Indianapolis, IN
Office: Senator (D-WA) since 2001
Previous office: Representative (WA 1st District) 1993–1995
Education: Miami University, Emmerich Manual High School
Movies: 14 Women

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Patty Murray
United States Senator
Patricia Lynn “Patty” Murray is the senior United States Senator from Washington and a member of the Democratic Party. Murray was first elected to the Senate in 1992, becoming Washington’s first female senator. Wikipedia
Born: October 11, 1950 (age 63), Bothell, WA
Nationality: American
Office: Senator (D-WA) since 1993
Spouse: Rob Murray (m. 1972)
Education: Washington State University (1972)
Children: Randy Murray, Sara Murray

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Debra Janette Lopez
Nationality > American
office : president : since 2007
Education Washing ton State University

Home About Contact Cut The Root Of Slavery House Bill Report
WE THE PEOPLE ARE NOT FOR SALE Rescue Me For Freedom Intervention
If you would like to give charity you can go to www.djsangelsinthefield.com​
Policy Advocacy
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President Bush signing the 2008 Trafficking Victims Protection Re authorization Act.
We work to advance state and federal policy related to the crime of human trafficking – creating protections for victims while seeking accountability for human traffickers and others that contribute to human trafficking. The Policy Program tracks, drafts, and analyzes legislation; drafts model laws and guidelines; provides and presents testimony; and engages the public through policy advocacy and grassroots outreach. Our work has helped win passage of key federal legislation and anti-trafficking laws in dozens of states, creating the long-term legal framework necessary to eradicate human trafficking.

Staff

WE THE PEOPLE ARE NOT FOR SALE
Debra J Lopez – President & Co-Founder
Lackshamaiah

Debra Lopez serves as co-founder and president of We The People Are Not For Sale . She leads the organization’s strategic and financial opportunities, to create tools, that engage business, government and roots in order to incubate and grow social enterprises to benefit enslaved and vulnerable communities.

Debra has soon will come with her first book, and has been recipient of two national journalist. We the people are not for sale fights human trafficking and modern-day slavery around the world. Through international work on the ground and in mainstream supply chains, we proactively target the root causes of slavery while engaging and equipping the movement for freedom.

ln 2007, DJ’s Angels has come to America to discovered that industry has growing ,than ever before. Not only was she was a slave but that she was free to see that slavery has become more his favorite Areas has been converted into, restaurant,hotels motels,and even in the back yards had been the center of a local human trafficking Trafficking industries. After further investigation, he realized this was part of a growing international issue spanning every industry and corner of the earth. From there, Not For Sale–both the organization and his 2007 book under the same name–was born.
OUR VISION
To re-abolish slavery in this lifetime.

OUR INSPIRATION
There are more than 30 million slaves today, more than at any other time in history. Men, women and children around the world are forced to work without pay and subjected to physical, mental and emotional exploitation-and the number is growing
OUR WORK

DJ’s Angels creates tools that engage business, government and grassroots in order to incubate and grow social enterprises to benefit enslaved and vulnerable communities.

Our mission is to end slavery, not to simply put a bandage on the wound that it creates. To do this, we identify and address the root causes in impoverished and vulnerable communities where individuals are easily taken advantage of by traffickers. Not For Sale has identified vulnerable regions across the world and empowers each against the rising tide of exploitation.

Through social projects spanning the globe in countries like Peru, the Netherlands, India, Thailand and South Africa, Not For Sale works to provide restoration, challenge institutional thinking, and create new futures for survivors.

Together, we can end slavery in our lifetime.

The success of Angels In The Field Rescue Me For Freedom, innovative and unique programs is rooted in the dedication of our staff, board, fellows and volunteers to work together towards a world without slavery.

Executive Management

DJ’S Angels /Executive Director and CEO
Debra Lopez serves as co-founder and president of We The People Are Not For Sale . She leads the organization’s strategic and financial opportunities, to create tools, that engage business, government and roots in order to incubate and grow social enterprises to benefit enslaved and vulnerable communities.
Debra has soon will come with her first book, and has been recipient of two national journalist. We the people are not for sale fights human trafficking and modern-day slavery around the world. Through international work on the ground and in mainstream supply chains, we proactively target the root causes of slavery while engaging and equipping the movement for freedom. Debra J Lopez – President & Co-Founder

Debra Lopez serves as co-founder and president of We The People Are Not For Sale . She leads the organization’s strategic and financial opportunities, to create tools, that engage business, government and roots in order to incubate and grow social enterprises to benefit enslaved and vulnerable communities.

Debra has soon will come with her first book, and has been recipient of two national journalist. We the people are not for sale fights human trafficking and modern-day slavery around the world. Through international work on the ground and in mainstream supply chains, we proactively target the root causes of slavery while engaging and equipping the movement for freedom.

ln 2007, DJ’s Angels has come to America to discovered that industry has growing ,than ever before. Not only was she was a slave but that she was free to see that slavery has become more his favorite Areas has been converted into, restaurant,hotels motels,and even in the back yards had been the center of a local human trafficking Trafficking industries. After further investigation, he realized this was part of a growing international issue spanning every industry and corner of the earth. From there, Not For Sale–both the organization and his 2007 book under the same name–was born.
OUR VISION
To re-abolish slavery in this lifetime.

OUR INSPIRATION
There are more than 30 million slaves today, more than at any other time in history. Men, women and children around the world are forced to work without pay and subjected to physical, mental and emotional exploitation-and the number is growing
OUR WORK

DJ’s Angels creates tools that engage business, government and grassroots in order to incubate and grow social enterprises to benefit enslaved and vulnerable communities.

Our mission is to end slavery, not to simply put a bandage on the wound that it creates. To do this, we identify and address the root causes in impoverished and vulnerable communities where individuals are easily taken advantage of by traffickers. Not For Sale has identified vulnerable regions across the world and empowers each against the rising tide of exploitation.

Through social projects spanning the globe in countries like Peru, the Netherlands, India, Thailand and South Africa, Not For Sale works to provide restoration, challenge institutional thinking, and create new futures for survivors.

Together, we can end slavery in our lifetime.

The success of Angels In The Field Rescue Me For Freedom, innovative and unique programs is rooted in the dedication of our staff, board, fellows and volunteers to work together towards a world without slavery.

Executive Management

DJ’S Angels /Executive Director and CEO

President Debra Jannett Lopez
Vice president Lakshumaiah Janumala
Director Mark Sortany
Police Department Les Watson
gary Flemming Crime advocate

Maria Cantwell
Senators220px-Maria_Cantwell,_official_portrait,_110th_Congress

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Treasure/
Associate Director/Not fill
Fund Raiser/Not fill

U.S. Capitol, Senate Office BuildingsHomsex-traffickingeAboutContactCut The Root Of SlaveryHouse Bill Report

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Labor Trafficking Intervention by DJMon, 23rd May, 2011
People are not for sale DJ Angels In The Field
Creates tools that engage Business, Government,and Grassroots in order to incubate and Grow social enterprises to benefit enslaved and vulnerable people and communities. DJs Fights human trafficking and modern-day slavery around the world. Through International work on the ground and in mainstreams supply chains,we, proactively target the root causes of slavery while engaging equipping the movement for freedom.“It ought to concern every person, because it is a debasement of our common humanity. It ought to concern every community, because it tears at our social fabric. It ought to concern every business, because it distorts markets. It ought to concern every nation, because it endangers public health and fuels violence and organized crime. I’m talking about the injustice, the outrage, of human trafficking, which must be called by its true name — modern slavery.”

President Barack Obama
30 Million People

Slavery

“It ought to concern every person, because it is a debasement of our common humanity. It ought to concern every community, because it tears at our social fabric. It ought to concern every business, because it distorts markets. It ought to concern every nation, because it endangers public health and fuels violence and organized crime. I’m talking about the injustice, the outrage, of human trafficking, which must be called by its true name — modern slavery.”

President Barack Obama

30 Million People

The modern-day slave trade is one of the fastest growing industries in the world, enslaving more than 30 million individuals today. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, “After drug dealing, trafficking of humans is tied with arms dealing as the second-largest criminal industry in the world.” Combating this $32 billion-dollar-a-year industry takes enormous effort as well as a large framework of diligent abolitionists. Slavery is wrapped up in almost every industry’s supply chain, tainting the food we eat, the clothes we buy and the electronics we love.

$32 Billion USD All businesses have supply chains. Numerous small companies work to provide the cotton in our t-shirts, the metals in our laptops and cellphones, as well as the sugar in our desserts. These raw materials come from all over the world. The businesses selling our t-shirts and chocolate and cell phones rarely know where these raw materials are coming from, or who is assembling the products before their final stages. This lack of transparency allows for unregulated production and many times unsafe or illegal practices in the workplace, including modern day slavery.

Vulnerable people and communities are targeted by recruiters, and traffickers and through deception, fraud and coercion are brought into slavery. While sex trafficking is often at the forefront of our awareness, slave labor and debt bondage are more common. Sometimes entire villages with few economic opportunities are targeted as ideal laborers who do not have other options. Often they will not immediately realize that the small loan they accepted will never be paid off due to the high interest rate charged by the lender. These situations are largely contextualized by a lack of economic empowerment. Identifying these regions and people is critical to stemming the tide of human trafficking.

Awareness of human trafficking has been on the rise over the past few years and it is important to be clear with our definition of slavery. Our definition of slavery is similar to that of the CNN Freedom Project:

Slavery occurs when one person completely controls another person, using violence or the threat of violence, to maintain that control, exploits them economically and they cannot walk away.

The definition of trafficking has 3 main components:
◾The action of trafficking; which means the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harboring or receipt of persons
◾The means of trafficking; which includes threat of or use of force, deception, coercion, abuse of power or position of vulnerability
◾The purpose of trafficking; which is always exploitation. In the words of the Trafficking Protocol, article 3 “exploitation shall include, at a minimum, the exploitation of the prostitution of others or other forms of sexual exploitation, forced labor or services, slavery or practices similar to slavery, servitude or the removal of organs.

Sex Trafficking

Sex trafficking is a growing global enterprise driven by deception, coercion and force.
Traffickers transport or detain their victims for the purpose of commercial sexual exploitation.
This trade in rape for profit thrives in the absence of robust law enforcement to
ensure the protection of the law for vulnerable children and women.

The Facts
• After drug dealing, human trafficking (both sex trafficking and
trafficking for forced labor) is tied with the illegal arms industry as the
second largest criminal industry in the world today, and it is the fastest
growing. (U.S. Department of Heath and Human Services)
• Worldwide, there are nearly two million children in
the commercial sex trade. (UNICEF)
• There are an estimated 600,000 to 800,000 children, women and men
trafficked across international borders annually. (U.S. Department of State)
• Approximately 80 percent of human trafficking victims are women and
girls, and up to 50 percent are minors. (U.S. Department of State)
• The total market value of illicit human trafficking is
estimated to be in excess of $32 billion. (U.N.)
• Sex trafficking is an engine of the global AIDS epidemic.
(U.S. Department of State)

DJs Angels In The Field Rescue Me For Freedom

International DJ’s Angels Mission’s first priority in its anti-trafficking casework is to secure
the protection of the law for trafficked women and children forced into commercial
sexual activity. DJ’s investigators spend hundreds of hours gathering and documenting
undercover evidence of trafficking and sexual exploitation. Using this evidence, staff
members then partner with local authorities to rescue victims from situations of ongoing
abuse and ensure that they have access to aftercare services to meet their vital needs. DJ’s Angels also,with local authorities to secure the conviction and sentencing of traffickers
and other perpetrators.

Sex trafficking will endure as long as it remains a profitable criminal enterprise. By freeing
victims and prosecuting their perpetrators, DJ’s operations increase the risk and decrease
the profitability of trafficking for those who would commit this crime. DJ;s Angels also works to
combat sex trafficking international as she rescue 5 children in Colombia,and soon India, Cambodia and the Philippines. DJs Angels investigations
have resulted in freedom for more than 1,000 girls and women held by force in the
commercial sex trade.

Labor trafficking occurs in diverse contexts that encompass all forms of labor or services. Common places where forced labor has been found in the United States include domestic servitude and small-scale labor operations, to more large-scale operations such as farms and factories. Certain labor brokers that supply labor to multinational corporations have also been identified as an emerging type of labor traffickers. Sex trafficking includes commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC), as well as every instance where an adult is in the sex trade as the result of force, fraud, or coercion. Sex trafficking occurs within numerous venues in the broader sex industry, commonly found in street prostitution, online escort services, residential brothels, and brothels disguised as legitimate massage parlors. Under U.S. and international law, commercially sexually exploited children found in the sex trade are considered to be victims of trafficking, even if no force or coercion is present.

Victims of human trafficking in the United States include U.S. citizens or foreign nationals, adults or minors, and men or women. Foreign-born victims in the U.S. may be either documented or undocumented.

Because human trafficking is considered to be one of the fastest growing criminal industries, the U.S. government and academic researchers are currently working on an up-to-date estimate of the total number of trafficked persons in the United States annually. With 100,000 children estimated to be in the sex trade in the United States each year, it is clear that the total number of human trafficking victims in the U.S. reaches into the hundreds of thousands when estimates of both adults and minors and sex trafficking and labor trafficking are aggregated.

Click here for information about human trafficking statistics in the U.S and abroad.

Click here for information about state, federal, and international anti-trafficking laws.

Click here to report a tip

Forms of forced labor have been found in numerous places in the United States, including cases of people forced to work in restaurants.
It is estimated that there are 100,000 children in the sex trade in the United States each year.

Most Visited: NHTRC
Human Trafficking
National Human Trafficking Resource Center
Sex Trafficking in the U.S.
Hostess/Strip Clubs – Sex Trafficking
Hotline Statistics
Hotline Call Vignettes
She informed her teacher of multiple postings advertising the young girl for commercial sex on Back-page.com…

Learn More
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,human trafficking InterventionMon, 23rd May, 2011

Our vision is to re-abolish slavery in this lifetime
There are more than 50 billion slaves today,more than at any other time in history. Men,Woman,and children around the world are force to work without pay and subjected to physical,mentally and emotional exploitation and the numbers are growing.

Young girls are forced to sell se
x by knocking on cab doors at truck stops.
Pimps use violence and coercion to commercially sexually exploit young women and girls.
Individuals may be forced to work in highly exploitative conditions with little to no pay.
Individuals are forced to prostitute on the streets and in hotels in order to meet nightly quotas and turn money over to their traffickers.1 2 3 4 «Play Pause»

Human trafficking is a form of modern-day slavery where people profit from the control and exploitation of others. As defined under U.S. federal law, victims of human trafficking include children involved in the sex trade, adults age 18 or over who are coerced or deceived into commercial sex acts, and anyone forced into different forms of "labor or services," such as domestic workers held in a home, or farm-workers forced to labor against their will. The factors that each of these situations have in common are elements of force, fraud, or coercion that are used to control people. Then, that control is tied to inducing someone into commercial sex acts, or labor or services. Numerous people in the field have summed up the concept of human trafficking as "compelled service." Every year, human traffickers generate billions of dollars in profits by victimizing millions of people around the world, and here in the United States. Human trafficking is considered to be one of the fastest growing criminal industries in the world. Click here to access human trafficking resource
Packs.
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Trafficking in Persons Report 2014


 

Date: 2014 Description: Trafficking in Persons Report 2014. - State Dept Image

“We each have a responsibility to make this horrific and all-too-common crime a lot less common. And our work with victims is the key that will open the door to real change—not just on behalf of the more than 44,000 survivors who have been identified in the past year, but also for the more than 20 million victims of trafficking who have not.

As Secretary of State, I’ve seen with my own two eyes countless individual acts of courage and commitment. I’ve seen how victims of this crime can become survivors and how survivors can become voices of conscience and conviction in the cause.

This year’s Trafficking in Persons Report offers a roadmap for the road ahead as we confront the scourge of trafficking.” – John F. Kerry, Secretary of State

The Report

The 2014 Trafficking in Persons Report report is available in PDF and HTML formats. Due to its large size, the PDF has been separated into sections for easier download. To view the PDF file, you will need to download, at no cost, the Adobe Acrobat Reader.

 

 

 

PDF Format

-Introductory Material (PDF)  [8975 Kb]
-Country Narratives: A-C (PDF)  [4743 Kb]
-Country Narratives: D-I (PDF)  [3882 Kb]
-Country Narratives: J-M (PDF)  [4105 Kb]
-Country Narratives: N-S (PDF)  [5513 Kb]
-Country Narratives: T-Z and Special Case (PDF)  [3105 Kb]
-Relevant International Conventions/Closing Material (PDF)  [963 Kb]
HTML Format

-Letter from Secretary Kerry
-Letter from Ambassador Luis CdeBaca
-The Journey from Victim to Survivor
-Definitions and Methodology
-Victims’ Stories
-Topics of Special Interest
-Global Law Enforcement Data
-2014 TIP Report Heroes
-Tier Placements
-Country Narratives
-Special Case
-Countries That Are Not States Parties to the Protocol
-Relevant International Conventions
-Trafficking Victims Protection Act: Minimum Standards for the Elimination of Trafficking in Persons
-Stopping Human Trafficking, Sexual Exploitation, and Abuse by International Peacekeepers & Civilian Personnel
-International, Regional, and Sub-Regional Organizations Combating Trafficking in Persons
-Glossary of Acronyms
-A Closing Note

Remarks

 

-06/20/14  Remarks at the Release of the 2014 Trafficking in Persons Report;  Secretary of State John Kerry; Ben Franklin Room; Washington, DC
-06/20/14  Briefing on the Trafficking in Persons Report 2014;  Ambassador-at-Large Luis CdeBaca, Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons; Via Teleconference

Fact Sheets

 

-International Programs To Combat Trafficking in Persons [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ]
-Journey From Victim to Survivor [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ]
-Profits and Poverty: The Economics of Forced Labor–International Labor Organization, 2014 [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ]
-Protection Checklist [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ]
-The Challenges of Certification in Addressing Forced Labor [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ]
-The Intersection Between Environmental Degradation and Human Trafficking [Get Acrobat Reader PDF version   ]

LETS JOIN TOGETHER WITH ANGELS IN THE FIELD MOVEMENT OF TRAFFICKING, SEX TRAFFICKING

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Consider ministering to young girls that have escaped through an advocacy, local juvenile detention facility, Woman’s shelter, or foster care program, most of this girls don’t know English and are vulnerable because of inability to speak the language or you can contact Debra/DJ’s Organization, there is a Angels  H.O.P.E, and Freedom for Me.  It also, offers training, and information materials for churches, news letter that we will be having in our website soon, Please, direct any girls or individual person that has been trafficked and child sexual exploited so, We as an organization , mentor girls  caught in Trafficking.

Sex Trafficking in the U.S.


Curtains are used to divide rooms in residential brothels, where women are forced to engage in commercial sex.

Sex trafficking occurs when people are forced or coerced into the commercial sex trade against their will.  Child sex trafficking includes any child involved in commercial sex.  Sex traffickers frequently target vulnerable people with histories of abuse and then use violence, threats, lies, false promises, debt bondage, or other forms of control and manipulation to keep victims involved in the sex industry.  Sex trafficking exists within the broader commercial sex trade, often at much larger rates than most people realize or understand.  Sex trafficking has been found in a wide variety of venues of the overall sex industry, including residential brothelshostess clubs, online escort servicesfake massage businessesstrip clubs, and street prostitution. For sex trafficking resource packs, click here.

National Human Trafficking Resource Center

1-888-3737-888

The National Human Trafficking Resource Center (NHTRC) is a national, toll-free hotline, available to answer calls from anywhere in the country, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, every day of the year.


The NHTRC is a program of Polaris Project, a non-profit, non-governmental organization working exclusively on the issue of human trafficking.
We are not a government entity, law enforcement or an immigration authority.

Call us at: 1-888-3737-888

 

Llama la línea gratuita y confidencial: 1-888-3737-888

  • Denunciar casos de trata;
  • Conectarse con servicios en su localidad;
  • Pedir información o recursos en español sobre la trata de personas y la esclavitud moderna.

The NHTRC needs your help! We are gathering information on how people use the internet to learn about our services and find our hotline number. This information will help us improve access to the hotline, and ultimately increase victim identification. Please take a moment to complete this brief survey.

This website was made possible in part through Grant Number 90ZV0087 from the Anti-Trafficking in Persons Division, Office of Refugee Resettlement, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Anti-Trafficking in Persons Division, the Office of Refugee Resettlement, or HHS.

2)Contact the National Human Trafficking resources if you suspect someone is being trafficked and needs help. Trafficking Victim can also contact the Center at 1888-373-7888. this  non-profit government hotline is open 24 hours a day,7 days a week.

3) Pray against the spiritual warfare that exist for people, such as DJ’ involved is exposing human trafficking and helping Victims.  There are powerful people in this country, Including the very wealthy and some high in politics,  Who are involved in trafficking Movement, and do not want our work to succeed, DJ’s Angels sails.  We need prayers for protection, provision, and the ability to reach and help these girls.

4) Donate funds to support Victims. Some girls associated with DJ’s Angels Ministry need cloth,food, and toiletries once they live prison.  Other needs help with fees for school. Contact DJ’s Angels  H.O.P.E for  Me.

  www.djsangelsinthefield.com

 

 

 

5) check our websites for more articles about what the church and other woman are doing.

ICE busts significant sex trafficking ring operating from Florida to North Carolina

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ICE busts significant sex trafficking ring operating from Florida to North Carolina
Operation Dark Night results in 13 criminal arrests, 44 administrative arrests and as many as 11 victims rescued
En español
ICE busts significant sex trafficking ring operating from Florida to North CarolinaICE busts significant sex trafficking ring operating from Florida to North CarolinaICE busts significant sex trafficking ring operating from Florida to North Carolina
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SAVANNAH, Ga. — Today, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) announced the results of a lengthy investigation, called Operation Dark Night, into a sex trafficking ring operating in Florida, Georgia and the Carolinas. The investigation, which was led by ICE’s Homeland Security Investigations (HSI), led to a takedown yesterday in which authorities made 13 criminal arrests and 44 administrative arrests tied to the investigation, as well as the rescue of as many as 11 victims.
“ICE investigates a wide array of crimes, but the trafficking of women and girls for prostitution is among the most sinister,” said ICE Director John Morton. “Few crimes so damage their victims and undermine basic human decency. Our fight against this evil must be relentless, both here and abroad.”
U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Georgia Edward Tarver said, “In what essentially amounts to slavery in the year 2013, the conduct described in the indictment against these defendants is reprehensible. This case is a prime example of the United States Attorney’s Office and HSI recognizing that human trafficking is a cancer facing our society and taking a stand to stop the victimization of women involved in sex trafficking.”
According to the indictment, Joaquin Mendez-Hernandez, aka El Flaco, conspired with each of the other defendants to transport people across interstate boundaries to engage in prostitution. In addition, Mendez-Hernandez allegedly conspired with at least three others to entice women from Mexico, Nicaragua and elsewhere to travel to the United States with false promises of the American dream. Once inside the United States, these women were allegedly threatened and forced to commit acts of prostitution at numerous locations in Savannah and throughout the Southeast. In one such instance identified in the indictment, Mendez-Hernandez is alleged to have told a Mexican woman that she would be sent back to her home country unless she serviced 25 clients a day.
HSI provides relief to victims of human trafficking by allowing for their continued presence in the United States during criminal proceedings. Victims may also qualify for a T visa, which is issued to victims of human trafficking who have complied with reasonable requests for assistance in investigations and prosecutions. Anyone who suspects instances of human trafficking is encouraged to call the HSI tip line at 1-866-DHS-2-ICE (866-347-2423) or the Human Trafficking Hotline at 1-888-373-7888. Anonymous calls are welcome.
Operation Dark Night was led by HSI, with assistance from the FBI; the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives; U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP); CBP Air and Marine Operations; the Internal Revenue Service’s Criminal Investigations; the Savannah-Chatham Metropolitan Police Department; the Chatham County Sheriff’s Office; the Garden City Police Department; and, the Chatham-Savannah Counter Narcotics Team. Assistant U.S. Attorney Tania D. Groover and E. Greg Gilluly Jr. are prosecuting the case on behalf of the United States.
Note to Editors: HD video and still images of this operation may be downloaded from the following website, after completing a brief registration process: http://www.dvidshub.net/unit/ICE.
You may also visit us on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, or access this news release on your mobile device.

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ICE busts significant sex trafficking ring operating from Florida to North Carolina

Gang sex trafficking: How a teen girl was lured into Northern Virginia’s

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0414110958 Angels In The Field girls from school that fighting Gang Sex trafficking

1fce1a54829f488a984ad1fa3a6eaf56_pnggangsGang sex trafficking: How a teen girl was lured into Northern Virginia’s sex industry | WJLA.com#ixzz2CgSfDrMi#ixzz2CgSfDrMi#ixzz2CgSfDrMi

India’s rape epidemic: Will the US apply pressure for change to its Asian ally?
Barnini Chakraborty
By Barnini ChakrabortyPublished July 04, 2014FoxNews.com
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May 31, 2014: Onlookers stand at the site where two teenage girls, who were raped, were hanged from a tree in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.Reuters
WASHINGTON – When the news of a young Indian woman brutally beaten and gang-raped on a moving bus in New Delhi went viral, vows to change the system and strip the stigma attached to victims came quickly.

Politicians across the country, responding to public pressure and global outrage in the wake of the 2012 attack on the 23-year-old female student and her male friend, promised they would modernize outdated policies on women and violence.

Collectively, it looked like the country was moving toward change and working hard to repair its global image. And for a while, it seemed to work.

But in late May, the bodies of two teenage girls were found hanging limply from a mango tree in their village in Uttar Pradesh. The girls, 14 and 15 years old, had been gang-raped. A week later, another case surfaced. Like the others, the girl had been raped and asphyxiated. She was found dead, hanging from a tree.

As the grisly cases start to emerge again, many are hoping the United States and others will apply pressure to their Asian ally to renew the fight against what is by any standard an epidemic of rape.

But it won’t be easy.

In recent years, U.S. officials have faced significant obstacles with India, ranging from disagreements over economic conditions which include grudges over limits on temporary work visas to polarizing political figures like the country’s new Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

Some say applying more pressure, even on an issue like rape, could strain the fragile U.S.-India relationship even more.

Others, like Shamila Chaudhary, a senior South Asia fellow at the New America Foundation, see it differently.

Chaudhary told FoxNews.com the U.S. government now has a chance to re-frame its relationship with India into one that would be beneficial to both countries and one that draws more attention to the epidemic ripping through the country.

The number of rapes reported in India from 1953 to 2011 has shot up 873 percent, according to statistics from the National Crime Records Bureau. In 2011, 24,206 rape cases were reported in India. (This increase could reflect, in part, a greater willingness by victims to come forward.)

Of those, 6,227 were in northern India, covering New Delhi where the bus rape took place.

Ruth Manorama, president of the National Alliance for Women, recently told The Wall Street Journal, “It is not a north India phenomena, it is an all India phenomena.”

A victim’s rights advocate based in the northern part of the country, who wished to remain anonymous, echoed the sentiment and told FoxNews.com that “the problem is not going away.”

She added that the data from the National Crime Records Bureau carries the caveat that the actual number of rapes still is much greater than the number being reported. Victims have long stayed silent in the face of societal pressures as well as reluctance by authorities to register reports of abuse.

“This type of terrible sexual violence, though horrific, is not unique to India,” U.S. State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki told FoxNews.com. “We continue to urge improved protections and rights for women and girls and accountability for perpetrators of such violence in countries around the world, including India.”

The State Department has, broadly, been speaking out more on the issue of sexual violence. In June, Secretary of State John Kerry vowed to “banish sexual violence to the dark ages and the history books.”

“We will not tolerate rape as a tactic of war and intimidation,” Kerry said during his keynote address at the Global Summit to End Sexual Violence in Conflict.

The four-day meeting – the first of its kind – was held in London last month. The U.S. was among 155 countries there that signed a declaration of commitment to end sexual violence in developing countries and regions.

From a political standpoint, how America responds to the rape crisis in India could have a ripple effect on ties with the country, which has been a key ally for the U.S. in the region.

The U.S. relationship with India has hit a few rough patches lately.

This year’s elections put the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) in power – a party that typically advocates conservative social policies, free market capitalistic principles and foreign policy driven by a nationalist agenda.

“It is in the national interest of both India and the U.S. to move beyond the current plateau in relations and build a durable and strategic partnership,” said Lisa Curtis, a senior research fellow at The Heritage Foundation.

Modi has been a controversial figure in Indian politics. His critics claim he did little to stop Hindu-Muslim riots in the state of Gujarat, where violence in 2002 led to the deaths of more than 1,000 people. For a time, the U.S. denied Modi a visa to enter the country – something that was reversed following the recent election.

But how the U.S. handles relations during Modi’s time in office has yet to be seen. The India-U.S. relationship has been tested and strained during the past several years, with one of the hardest hits coming last December when the U.S. arrested Indian diplomat Devyani Khobragade on charges she lied about how much she paid her housekeeper as well as allegations of mistreatment.

Experts like Curtis say the U.S. must now reframe its relationship with India, striking a balance between tough messages on terrorism and women’s rights, as well as capitalizing on economic opportunities.

Back in Washington, senators sat down last week to discuss how to reduce violence against women and discrimination around the world.

The hearing came as lawmakers tried for the fourth time since 2007 to pass the International Violence Against Women Act, which would make stopping violence against women a diplomatic priority for the U.S.

Sens. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., and Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., were among the lawmakers who took up the thorny topic at the Senate Subcommittee on International Operations and Organizations, Human Rights, Democracy, and Global Women’s Issues hearing.

But despite some bipartisan support, the bill has never been voted out of the subcommittee.

“I struggle to understand why the United States has failed to pass the convention, but I understand politics,” Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., said. “We need to acknowledge our responsibility and our leadership on issues.”

india rape epidemic

Gang Involvement with Human Trafficking
Posted on November 18, 2013 by Michelle Lillie
gangsSex trafficking has traditionally been propagated by small-time local opportunists looking to make a large profit with little work. While these small-time traffickers still exist, sex trafficking rings run by gangs and other large criminal enterprises are increasingly becoming the norm. Human trafficking is now the world’s fastest growing criminal enterprise, second only to drug trafficking and as profitable as the illegal arms trade. Sex trafficking is enormously profitable due to the ability to sell a person for sex many times as compared to drugs or guns which can only be sold once. Due to expansive criminal networks as well as the ease of technology, sex trafficking will only continue to grow.

A Growing Problem
For the past ten years the number of gangs in the US has steadily increased to an estimated 25,000. As gang membership has grown, so has gang involvement with human trafficking. Global Centurion has identified over 200 cases of human trafficking in the US in which gang members have been involved. The FBI reported that The Bloods, MS-13, Sureños, and Somali gangs are involved in human trafficking. Twenty-four members of The Bloods were recently arrested in Northern Virginia for conspiracy to commit sex trafficking. The MS-13 or Mara Salvatrucha are also located in the Washington DC metro area and have the distinction of being the first street gang to be declared a transnational criminal organization by the US government. Earlier this year an MS-13 member was sentenced to 10 years in prison for his involvement with a sex trafficking ring in Northern Virginia. The Sureños, a group of imprisoned gang members who pay tribute to the Mexican Mafia, are heavily engaged in human trafficking. The Somali gangs are made up of Somali refugees and immigrants located mainly in the Minneapolis / Saint Paul area of Minnesota. In 2012, six Somali gang members were tried and three convicted of sex trafficking minors through three states.

Ease of Technology
Due to the ease of technology, street gangs are able to meet the high demand for sex with young girls and women. Gangs commonly use websites like Facebook, MySpace, Twitter and Instagram to lure young girls into commercial sexual exploitation. Andrea Powell, the advocate who runs Fair Girls, says she’s seen girls recruited from almost every social network that exists. Facebook and Tagged are two of the most common, she says, but even more limited sites like Twitter and Instagram get used for solicitation. Traffickers are becoming more tech-savvy and with the Internet so accessible in the US, it is not difficult for a lonely, young girl looking for love and attention to be tricked or coerced into becoming a victim of sex trafficking. Gang members then commonly use websites like Craigslist.org or Backpage.com to sell their victims. Backpage.com produces about 70 percent of all online prostitution ads in the US. While federal and local law enforcement are aware and monitor these websites, it is not sufficient to stop the growing demand and ease of access for sex with young women.

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Sold for Sex: The Link Between Street Gangs and Human Trafficking
by Laura J. Lederer
within Culture, Politics

In order to curtail human sex trafficking successfully, we must take seriously that street gangs are a large part of the problem.

In April of this year, in Oceanside, California, thirty-eight Crips gang members, their alleged associates, and two hotel owners were arrested for engaging in a sex trafficking enterprise that involved the prostitution of minors and adult females. After raping their victims and threatening to kill them if they tried to escape, the gang members sold the girls online. The girls were trapped in a hotel for twelve hours a day, as men who had purchased their bodies from the gang members had sex with them. Though these commercial sex acts brought in between $1,000 to $3,000 dollars a day, the young women and children never saw a penny of the money. Their only payment was food, avoiding beatings, and staying alive.

In a similar case this past June, an MS-13 gang member was indicted for trafficking girls at a Super 8 motel just outside of Washington, D.C. At least one of the girls was only fifteen when she was sold. He advertised her as a “high school girl” and “fresh out of the box.” A year earlier, in Brooklyn, New York, eight members of the Bloods street gang were also charged with sex trafficking of minors. They solicited customers using online websites. The victims, recruited from local junior high and high schools, were trafficked into prostitution. The traffickers made $500 a day.

The facts from hundreds of criminal cases show a clear link between dangerous street gangs and the scourge of human trafficking. Over the last decade, the United States has passed numerous laws to address criminal gang activity. Similarly, in 2000, Congress passed the Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA) to curtail trafficking in persons. But the enforcement of each law has developed independently of the others, with little, if any, integration. This is unfortunate and represents a missed opportunity not only to save the victims of a terrible crime, but also to add another prosecution weapon against the dangerous street gangs that endanger our communities and our nation.

With state and national crackdowns on drug trafficking, gangs have turned to sex trafficking for financial gain. Unlike drugs, girls can be used more than once, and it is the girls, not the traffickers, who run the greatest risk of being caught and prosecuted. Case records show that gangs still utilize traditional methods of recruiting, employing the modern equivalent of wining and dining a young girl (“skip parties” and “love showers”), winning her heart and then slowly “seasoning” her for the street by sharing her with other gang members. One young woman described her trafficker’s request for a “love donation”: sex she had to provide to other men to win her place in the gang.

But women and children also describe being coerced into a life of prostitution after being subjected to severe beatings and gang rapes, and being deprived of food and water. The victims of trafficking are made to feel both afraid of and dependent on the traffickers for their very lives.

New technological advances give gang traffickers the ability to market the services of their victims discreetly. In several high-profile prosecutions of sex trafficking in Seattle, San Diego, and New York, street gangs used online advertisements on websites such as Craigslist and Backpage to traffic women and girls as young as thirteen. Once arrangements are made over the internet and by cell phone, the victimization that takes place behind closed doors is the same as in other trafficking cases: women and children are delivered to customers and forced to perform sex acts for money that is paid to and pocketed by their traffickers.

The U.S. government has prosecuted several hundred cases against street gangs, motorcycle gangs, and prison gangs in which commercial sex acts, prostitution, or human trafficking were mentioned; the gang members, however, were charged with drug and weapons trafficking, armed robbery, auto theft, extortion, home invasions, and other felony offenses—not human trafficking. Human trafficking charges are rarely the primary basis for prosecution; though, since late 2010, there have been a few such cases.

One reason that street gangs have not been prosecuted for human trafficking is that too many prosecutors and law enforcement officials assume that human trafficking in America is primarily an international problem. A recent Department of Justice Bureau of Justice Statistics report, however, found that 83% of victims in confirmed sex trafficking incidents are actually U.S. citizens.

The vigorous prosecution of human trafficking can help bring down street gangs that also engage in murder, robbery, and drug trafficking. Before that can happen, however, state and local government officials must learn how to combat the human trafficking that is occurring in their own backyards. The Department of State’s 2011 Trafficking in Persons Report found that less than 10 percent of state and local law enforcement agencies have any kind of protocol or policy on human trafficking. While great strides have been made in addressing international human trafficking and local street gang activity, little has been done to link the two.

In order to combat street gang involvement in human trafficking more effectively, new approaches must be undertaken: (1) State and local governments must add human trafficking to the list of suspect activities for criminal gangs; (2) gang and human trafficking task forces must coordinate and plan joint prosecutions; (3) gang investigations should include specific tactics for actively spotting human trafficking; (4) gangs involved in human trafficking should be charged under the TVPA or state trafficking-in-persons laws in addition to other criminal charges; (5) communities should develop specialized outreach, education, and training programs to address gang-related trafficking; (6) asset forfeiture laws should be utilized more extensively in gang-related human trafficking cases; and (7) new and creative approaches to prosecution (such as using the child soldiers provision in the TVPA) should be explored and established.

Street gangs are increasingly turning to human trafficking as a way to generate the funds that are necessary for their existence and operations. Little is known about the dynamics involved in this trafficking, and additional research on the methods of recruiting, transporting, harboring, marketing, buying, and selling involved in gang-related human trafficking is important.

We do know, however, that street gangs engage in human trafficking because the risk is low and the profit is high. We must draft and pass new laws targeting gang-related human trafficking. In addition, diligent law enforcement tactics that help identify street gangs involved in human trafficking must be developed. Federal and local law enforcement authorities should encourage collaboration between the current efforts to address human trafficking and prosecute street gangs. Finally, education about street gangs and human trafficking that is tailored for parents, teachers, and community leaders is critical to strengthening community resistance to human trafficking and other criminal gang activities.

Laura Lederer is President of Global Centurion Foundation, an NGO that combats human trafficking by focusing on the demand-side economics of trafficking. She is also an adjunct professor at Georgetown Law Center in Washington, D.C. A longer version of this article on street gangs and human trafficking will be available November 1, 2011, in the Johns Hopkins University Journal of Human Rights.

Sold as a Slave @ 14

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She was only 14 when her mother sold her as a slave. Yet today, by the grace of God, she ministers to other women in the same situation. Hear the amazing story of DJ who spent 22 years as a sex slave.

Healing through the Grace of God

But who would have thought today people can be bought or sold for money, drugs, or a price. It seems so medieval, something from 18th century at the height of the slave trade. Yes, slavery is alive today. The UN believes 27 million people are living in bondage. Current jargon calls this “human trafficking”, but it’s no different than the historic slave trade. Women, children, and yes, men too, are bought/sold as commodities for labor, brothels, exploitation and even the removal of organs. Forced through threats, violence, mutilation, and coercion to work in sweatshops factories, farms, motels, strip joints, as domestics, sculleries, and recruiters for even more victims.

Slavery in the 21st Century

Forced laborers, housekeepers, nannies, prostitution, bondage:

Selling humans is Illegal-all,over the world . AngelsInThe Field Rescue, Rehabilitation Educationpreventionspeakingengagements.Breaking the cycle. report Human Slavery if you know someone is in this situation call don't just let it go. sometimes some of the slavery,end in domestic violence because human gets torture or mentally abuse,beaten. You never know when you can save a life by reporting some of suspicious Act. If you hear anything that you think is domestic violence or you think someone is been taken. Report it. suspicious bars with teen is illegal and is child sexual exploited. Woman in the windows, that is a sign of slavery Report it. A child or a teenager in the street at 12Am in the morning is a sign of prostitution. Thank You for reporting. By DJs Angels I was a slave 22 years of slavery and 22th years of knowledge of the trade of Human trafficking