Human Trafficking in Washington States

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Not In Our Cities
Why Human Trafficking? (article written and submitted by Gennevieve St. Leger) Why Human Trafficking? Why do criminals and criminal organizations traffic in humans? This question can be answered with one word: money. Human trafficking is the third most profitable business for organized crime; the first and second are drug and arms trafficking. Pino Arlacchi, Director General for the International Seminar on Trafficking in Human Beings in Brazil, states that many drug traffickers are switching to human trafficking due to higher profits and lower risk. The United Nations estimates the total number of people trafficked every year is between 700 thousand and 1 million. It also estimates that 79 percent of these victims are trafficked for sexual exploitation. Human trafficking takes place in every country and it generates tens of billions of dollars of profit each year. What is Human Trafficking? Human trafficking is “the acquisition of people by improper means such as force, fraud, or deception, with the aim of exploiting them.” Human Trafficking applies to all people, not just women but men too. Not just children but also adults. Sometimes people are forced away from their homes violently. Other times they are tricked with promises of food, shelter, and an overall better life. Sometimes a trusted friend or family member sees a poor family struggling and offers to take custody of a child or two to provide them with better shelter and ample food. Some are told they can get a good paying farming or factory job in a nearby town; however, they never get what they are promised. The main objective of traffickers is to exploit the people they take. This exploitation can be sexual; forcing the victims to become prostitutes in brothels or sex slaves for a master. Or, this exploitation can be based on labor; where victims are forced into various forms of non-sexual servitude. What is the Difference Between Human Trafficking and Smuggling of Persons? Smuggling of persons is when one pays a person to smuggle them into a county illegally. One of the main differences between human trafficking and smuggling is consent. Victims of human trafficking do not consent to being transported to another country nor do they consent to what happens when they get to their destination. In smuggling, the person wants to go to the country the smuggler takes them to. Once a smuggled immigrant gets into his or her desired country that person is free to find employment, to find a place to live, and so-on. A victim of human trafficking is forced to work where his or her abductors demand and the victim does not receive any compensation for the work; the abductors keep all proceeds of the victims’ labor. Smuggling is always transporting a person from one country to another. Many human trafficking victims never leave their country, or even their state. Sometimes, people who pay to be smuggled into another country become victims of human trafficking. After being voluntarily smuggled into another country these victims become exploited by their smugglers and are forced into brothels or to work for very little or nothing.137ARRESTED

Children has compiled the following U.S. and international statistics on human trafficking, child trafficking and sex trafficking.thumb Prostituted sm These trafficking stats were sought so we could research the needs of rescued child trafficking victims. These became our keys towards our plan for the Harbourage safe homes for child trafficking survivors. Statistics are updated bi-yearly and sources are at the end.
Statistics compiled

* “When a child has been recruited, transported, harbored, or received and some commercial element is introduced in the production of child pornography, then that individual has also engaged in child trafficking. Whether they work in strip clubs or sweatshops, these boys and girls are victims of human trafficking.”

* The Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA) defines “severe forms of trafficking in persons” as: sex trafficking in which a commercial sex act is induced by force, fraud, or coercion, or in which the person induced to perform such an act has not attained 18 years of age.”

* “The economic reality is that human trafficking is driven by profits. If nobody paid for sex, sex trafficking would not exist.”
Where do trafficked children come from?

thumb barbed wire ark 600flatChild trafficking victims, whether for labor, sex or organ trafficking, come from all backgrounds, include both boys and girls. They span a wide age range from 1 to 18 years old. Sex trafficking victims up to roughly 25 years old most often started as young as 14. Children are trafficked out of, or into the United States from all regions of the world and represent a variety of different races, ethnic groups and religions. They may be brought to the U.S. legally or smuggled in.

Trafficked children can be lured to the U.S. through the promise of school or work and promised the opportunity to send money back to their families. Children are also vulnerable to kidnappers, pimps, and professional brokers. Some children are even sold to traffickers by their families, who may or may not have an understanding of what will happen to the child. U.S. born children are also trafficked within the U.S., coming from any racial group, socio-economic background, and come from or trafficked within both city and rural areas.
The numbers;

Update: In 2012 the (UNODC) United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime reports the percentage of child victims had risen in a 3 year span from 20 per cent to 27 per cent. Of every three child victims, two are girls and one is a boy.

Gender and age profile of victims detected globally: 59% Women – 14% Men – 17% Girls and 10% were Boys.

600,000 to 800,000 women, children and men bought and sold across international borders every year and exploited for forced labor or commercial sex (U.S. Government)
When internal trafficking victims are added to the estimates, the number of victims annually is in the range of 2 to 4 million
50% of those victims are estimated to be children
It is estimated that 76 percent of transactions for sex with underage girls start on the Internet
2 million children are subjected to prostitution in the global commercial sex trade (UNICEF)
There are 20.9 Million victims of Trafficking World wide as of 2012
1.5 Million victims in the United States

The impact;

Human trafficking has surpassed the illegal sale of armsthumb No More
Trafficking will surpass the illegal sale of drugs in the next few years
Drugs are used once and they are gone. Victims of child trafficking can be used and abused over and over
A $32 billion-a-year industry, human trafficking is on the rise and is in all 50 states (U.S. Government)
4.5 Million of trafficked persons are sexually exploited
Up to 300,000 Americans under 18 are lured into the commercial sex trade every year
From 14,500 – 17,500 of those victims are trafficked into the United States each year

Click to read the Needs of Rescued Trafficking Victims
According to non-governmental U.S. sources;

Average victims age is 11 to 14
Approx 80% are women and children bought, sold and imprisoned in the underground sex service industry
Average life span of a victim is reported to be 7 years (found dead from attack, abuse, HIV and other STD’s, malnutrition, overdose or suicide)

The largest group of at-risk children are runaway, thrown away, or homeless American children who use survival sex to acquire food, shelter, clothing, and other things needed to survive on America’s streets. According to the National Runaway Switchboard 1.3 million runaway and homeless youth live on America’s streets every day. [5,000 die each year] It would not be surprising to learn that the number of children trafficked in the United States is actually much higher than 300,000.

Children are often targeted by traffickers as they are deemed easier to manipulate than adults. More money can be earned by younger girls and boys exploited in sexual exploitation, especially virgins. Pre-pubescent girls are reported to be injected with hormones to bring on puberty. Younger girls are expected to have a greater earning potential, and as such are in greater demand.
Physical and Mental Consequences of Trafficking for victims;thumb Beaten

Child victims of human trafficking face significant problems. Often physically and sexually abused, they have distinctive medical and psychological needs that must be addressed before advancing in the formative years of adulthood.
Child victims of exploitation can face a number of long-term health problems:
Sleeping and eating disorders
Sexually transmitted diseases
HIV/AIDS, pelvic pain, rectal trauma and urinary difficulties from working in the sex industry
Drug addiction
Chronic back, hearing, cardiovascular or respiratory problems from endless days toiling in dangerous agriculture, sweatshop or construction conditions
Fear and anxiety
Depression, mood changes
Guilt and shame
Cultural shock from finding themselves in a strange country
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
Traumatic bonding with the trafficker

Click to read about Ark of Hope’s planned Harbourage Safe Homes for Child Trafficking Victims
Pull factors;thumb Leaving home-2

Demand for cheap labor and for prostituted women, girls, and boys is the primary “pull” factor. Common push and pull factors exploited by traffickers include:

Unemployment and perceived job opportunities overseas (into the U.S.)
Unhappy home situation: The victim may be in an abusive situation, their family may be in debt, or there may be an addict in the family
Relatives and friends live in the destination country
Returning migrants, legal and illegal, say they have made a better living for themselves

Sex buyers are far more complicit in the victimization of sex trafficking victims. Sex tourism and child pornography have become worldwide industries, facilitated by technologies such as the Internet, which vastly expand the choices available to pedophiles and permit instant and nearly undetectable transactions.
Trafficking Victims:

Child trafficking victims, like other child victims, come from many backgrounds and include both boys and girls across a widethumb Foster sisters range of ages.
Children are trafficked to the U.S. from all regions of the world and represent a variety of different races, ethnic groups and religions.
They may be brought to the U.S. legally or smuggled in.
Internationally trafficked children, especially adolescents, may be lured overseas to the U.S. through the promise of work or school and the opportunity to send money back to their families.
Children are also vulnerable to kidnappers, pimps, and professional brokers.
Some children are sold to traffickers by their families, who may or may not have an understanding of what will happen to the child.
U.S. citizen children may also be trafficked within the U.S., and come from multiple racial groups and socio-economic backgrounds.

The Needs of Rescued Trafficking Victims
Runaways:

Many youth, especially U.S. citizen children trafficked within the U.S., run away from problems at home and may be exploited as a result of emotional vulnerability, homelessness and the need to survive. Youth who run away from home and engage in “survival sex” often find themselves vulnerable to pimps and traffickers involved in prostitution networks. Approximately 55% of street girls, and a good percentage of boys, engage in formal prostitution and some think it is much higher than that. This means that a child client who has been homeless or living on the street for any amount of time has a great likelihood of having been sexually exploited or trafficked.thumb Street Kid

The sexual exploitation of children is not limited to particular racial, ethnic or socioeconomic groups, although children from poor families appear to be at somewhat higher risk of commercial sexual exploitation. In fact, most of the street children encountered in the study were Caucasian youths who had run away from middle-class families. One clear theme is the is proportionate number of street youth who have histories of recurrent physical or sexual abuse at home and took to the streets in a desperate effort to bring their abuse to an end.

According to these researchers, child sexual exploitation in the United States affects as many boys as girls, but boys are less well-served by social service and law enforcement systems because of the widespread belief that boys are better able than girls to fend for themselves. Without intervention, research has shown many boys shift from being victims of sexual abuse to victimizing other boys and girls as pimps and traffickers.

People are recruited in several different ways such as through fake employment agencies, acquaintances, newspaper ads, front businesses, word of mouth or abduction. Traffickers may be neighbors, friends, returnees, agricultural operators, owners of small businesses, diplomats and even families. Increasingly, however, the traffickers are organized crime syndicates, often in collaboration with corrupt law enforcement entities, government officials or employers, who may use several intermediaries from the first point of contact to the final destination of the victim. If the victim is transported, they use both legal and illegal means of transport and various techniques to keep their victim enslaved.

They may keep them under lock and key or in isolation from the public and from their family members or support networks, confiscate their passports or identification documents, use the threat of violence against the enslaved person or their families, threaten them with shame, fear of imprisonment or deportation, and control their money.

The psychological effects of torture are helplessness, shame and humiliation, shock, denial and disbelief, disorientation and confusion, and anxiety disorders including post traumatic stress disorder, phobias, panic attacks and depression. Victims may experience Traumatic Bonding (Stockholm Syndrome) – a form of coercive control in which the perpetrator instills in the victim fear as well as gratitude for being allowed to live or for any other perceived favors, however small.
Ark of Hope for Children’s sources for U.S. and international trafficking statistics;

2012 UNITED NATIONS OFFICE ON DRUGS AND CRIME Global Report – Vienna

U.S. Trafficking In Persons Report – June 2012

Trafficking Victims Protection Act

U.S. Trafficking In Persons Report – June 2011

Child Trafficking Update – October 2011

Defender Foundation

FBI on Human Sex Trafficking – March 2011

Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre, Hanoi

Child Victims of Human Trafficking Report- Dept Health & Human Services

Crimes Against Children Report- Interpol – September 2009

Trafficking in Human Beings Report- Interpol – December 2009
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About DJS ANGELS

DJ is a survivor of human trafficking. Her story can be seen at:
http://amicuscuria.com/wordpress/?p=5019 along with a documentary called:
Born In A Brothel
The stories told are intense and Parental Guidance for young audiences is advised.
Angels In The Field is a non-profit organization dependent on charitable donations to fight human trafficking.
It’s founder and is a 501c3   (DJ) can be reached as follows:
tel. (360)463-7912
e-mail: djangelsinthefield@gmail.com
address: PO Box 1693, Shelton, WA 98584

DJ’s Angels  as co-founder and president of  Angels In The Field Rescue Me For Freedom and Justice.  I leads the organization’s strategic and financial opportunities to create tools that engage business, government and grassroots in order to incubate and grow social enterprises to benefit enslaved and vulnerable communities.

Angels In The Field creates tools that engage business, government, and grassroots in order to incubate and grow social enterprises to benefit enslaved and vulnerable communities.fights human trafficking and modern-day slavery around the world. Through international work on the ground and in mainstream supply chains, we proactively target the root causes of slavery while engaging and equipping the movement for freedom.   In 2007, Debra Jannett Lopez  discovered that his favorite and lovebly mother would betray her on selling DJ In India were her grandmother lived in India. Were slavery has been going for many Generation every place you go there is a reality of slavery , had been the center of a local brothels full human trafficking ring.  After further investigation, he realized this was part of a growing international issue spanning every industry and corner of the earth. From there, both the organization and her 2007 was born Angels In The Field Rescuing victims of slavery and working with senators trying to fight the new era of slavery and the movement of Freedom reigns all over the world. My vision as an ex slave is to safe as much victims as i can rescuing to re abolish the humans out a underground slavery.  There are more than 50 Billions  slaves today, more than at any other time in history. Men, women and children around the world are forced to work without pay and subjected to physical, mental and emotional exploitation-and the number is growing.
OUR WORK
Angels In The Field

creates tools that engage business, government and grassroots in order to incubate and grow social enterprises to benefit enslaved and vulnerable communities. Our mission is to end slavery, not to simply put a bandage on the wound that it creates. To do this, we identify and address the root causes in impoverished and vulnerable communities where individuals are easily taken advantage of by traffickers. Not For Sale has identified vulnerable regions across the world and empowers each against the rising tide of exploitation.

Through social projects spanning the globe in countries like Peru, the Netherlands, India, Thailand and South Africa, DJ’ works to provide restoration, challenge institutional thinking, and create new futures for all Humans.
OUR WORK
Angels In The Field rescue Me for Freedom

DJ  creates tools that engage business, government and grassroots in order to incubate and grow social enterprises to benefit enslaved and vulnerable communities.

Our mission is to end slavery, not to simply put a bandage on the wound that it creates. To do this, we identify and address the root causes in impoverished and vulnerable communities where individuals are easily taken advantage of by traffickers. Not For Sale has identified vulnerable regions across the world and empowers each against the rising tide of exploitation.

Through social projects spanning the globe in countries like Peru, the Netherlands, India, Thailand and South Africa, Angels In The Field ,works to provide restoration, challenge institutional thinking, and create new futures for survivors.

Together, we can end slavery in our lifetime. We are Humans, and we are not for sale.

 

 

 

 

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